Movement is at the very core of how children develop intellectually, emotionally, socially, and of course, physically. Here at Moving Smart we foster children's naturally move-to-learn style while helping parents and teachers understand the comprehensive benefits of all that wiggling!

That's why we say "A Moving Child is a Learning Child."

Thursday, July 24, 2014

THE SEVEN SENSES

































Seven? Yes, seven.

Beyond the five senses we learn about in school (sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) there are actually two more: the vestibular system (sense of balance) and proprioception (our intuitive sense of space and position).

Now, I realize these may not be words you’re familiar. So you might be surprised to hear that the vestibular system and the proprioceptive sense make possible just about everything we do (even sleeping). And they do so without our notice. That’s because, as adults, we’ve had years of experience with these senses so they are automatic to us.


But they are NOT automatic to kids. Like the other five senses, kids need to learn what these senses are trying to tell them through the trial-and-error process of everyday living, playing, and moving. And because they guide and govern how we use our bodies, the vestibular and proprioceptive senses contribute to every major milestone and are often behind those fall-down-and-go-boom moments.

So, let’s take a quick tour these two not-so-well-known senses…

SENSE #6 – THE VESTIBULAR SYSTEM (BALANCE)
The vestibular system is the scientific term for our sense of balance, responsible for keeping us upright and in balance. And if you think about it, without balance, we pretty much couldn’t do anything. For instance, if you’re reading this sitting down, your vestibular system is keeping you upright and in the chair. Now, you might be thinking the chair is keeping you upright, but in fact, if your brain didn’t understand which way was up, you’d tip right over. And notice how you don’t have to THINK about staying upright. Your vestibular system is doing it for you automatically, every day, 24 hours a day.

Conversely, kids are focused on their balance a lot. Have you ever noticed when a child sits in a chair he fidgets around? Yes, sometimes he has to go to the bathroom, but quite often, what you’re seeing is his vestibular system at work with his body, helping him adjust himself to feel in balance. In fact, whenever a child moves (on or off the chair, indoors or out, fast or slow, right-side up or upside down, etc., etc.), his inner ear reacts to and records those movements, giving his brain important information about the body’s orientation at any given moment. Over time and with lots of different kinds of movement, his brain will begin to determine what is and isn’t “in balance” for him.

SENSE #7 – PROPRIOCEPTION (SPACE & POSITION)
Proprioception, or what I call Intuition, is our body and brain working together to understand and navigate space and objects. Again, for adults this is automatic and intuitive. Without thinking about it, you know if your body will fit through a passageway. You climb stairs without looking at them. You have a sense of how much strength you need to push open a door. And you don’t fall out of bed at night. Your proprioceptive sensors (residing in your muscles, tendons, and ligaments) have helped you develop these navigation skills over many years of practical, everyday movements and experiences with space and objects.

A child, of course, is less experienced so so it's not automatic yet. We can guide him, but only to a point. That’s because the only way for a child to truly know his own body is to use it. And yes, that includes bumping into furniture, tripping over his own feet, pushing too hard, and all those other things we think of as kid-clumsy. It’s just his body and brain working together to learn about his environment using his proprioceptive senses to pave the way.



WHY IS HE STILL CLUMSY?
Parents often ask me when kids will stop being so clumsy. Surely, if they can walk, run, and jump, they must have mastered these senses by now?

Well, of course, those physical capabilities are signs of his maturing vestibular and proprioceptive senses. But he’s not done yet for one simple reason… he’s growing. As the body changes, the brain needs to readjust its understanding of balance, orientation, and of course, space. And that will take all of his growing years. For instance, the play tunnel he could walk through last year, he has to duck down to get through this year. Next year, he’ll probably have to get on all-fours and crawl through it.

The thing to look out for isn’t when he bumps into things, but when he begins navigating things on his own. That’s when all his senses, his life experience (memory), and emerging problem solving skills are combining to give him an automatic sense of himself… without the fall-down-and-go-boom part.

You can find more information on the Vestibular and Proprioceptive senses in our book A Moving Child Is a Learning Child by Free Spirit Publishing.



Like the other senses, developing the vestibular and proprioceptive senses actually begins before birth and continues all throughout the early years of life. Simple, everyday, playful activities help teach the brain what balance, space, and position feel like

HUG & DIP
FOR YOUNG BABIES (PRE-WALKING)


Sit in a chair so you’re very steady, and hold baby upright close to your chest so he feels your sense of touch all around his body. Supporting baby’s neck and back (see photographs), very slowly lean baby back and rest him horizontally on your lap. Hold for a few moments, then continuing to support his neck and back, tip baby back so that his feel are slightly above his head in an upside down position. Hold again for a few moments, then slowly bring baby back to your lap, then back up to your chest.

PLEASE NOTE: As with any activity with young children, go slow and be very gentle with your movements. If at any time you feel baby is not enjoying the activity, stop immediately. You can always try it another time.

WHAT’S HAPPENING HERE? First, by holding him close so he feels your touch 360 degrees around his body, you are giving his proprioceptive senses an all-over feel for his own body. Then, by slowly and gently changing his orientation (starting with his head up, then horizontal, then slightly upside down his vestibular system recognizes and records these changes in position, giving his brain important clues to all the possible ways the body can move.

LET’S GO FOR A SPIN!
FOR TODDLERS ABLE TO SIT UP ON THEIR OWN WITHOUT SUPPORT
Find a cardboard box big enough for the child to sit in and hold onto the sides. Sit the child in the box, then slowly spin the box around. As the child gets accustomed to the sensations give him a gentle ride around the room in different directions, spinning, zig-zagging, etc.

WHAT’S HAPPENING HERE? Sitting the child in the box gives him a sense of himself fitting into space (proprioception). When you spin him or give him a ride, his brain is using the vestibular system to keep his orientation upright and in balance.


WORM ALONG
FOR PRESCHOOLERS ABLE TO CRAWL, WALK, AND RUN


Lay out a plank several inches off the ground, threading one or more hoops through the plank. (See photograph). Encourage the child to crawl across the plank. Each time he reaches the hoop, encourage him to crawl through the hoop while maintain his balance on the plank. As the child gains confidence, suggest trying to walk across the plank, crawling through the hoops as he goes.

PLEASE NOTE: Stand by for support as the child needs it.

WHAT’S HAPPENING HERE? Of course, the plank is a great test of the child’s ability to control his balance on a narrow surface. By adding the hoops, you are challenging his coordination and proprioceptive senses to navigate a completely different shape of space.

Sunday, March 30, 2014

MEETING NATURE: On Our Way to the Duck Pond




Some time ago when my granddaughter was visiting, we took a walk in the park as we always did. Caitlin loved the duck pond and we usually made a brisk beeline straight to the ducks. But that day was different. The flowers caught Caitlin’s eye, so we stopped to explore…

At first I stepped back to watch as she crouched to meet the flowers up close. Her fingers reached out instinctively to touch a daisy. I told her how much I liked that she was gentle with the flowers because we want to keep them safe for everyone to enjoy.

Like a little bumblebee, she buzzed from flower to flower gathering new information, insights, and ideas, while I did my best to keep up, adding the words she didn’t have to describe her floral journey.

I marveled at the different flowers in the bed, narrating as she touched each one… yellow, pink, white, orange… lilies, daisies, poppies, roses, gladiolas. 

I wondered what the flowers smelled like. She leaned in and sniffed each flower, the pollen sticking to her nose.

I couldn’t decide which were my favorites, so Caitlin helped me choose.

It turns out, I love roses and lilies the best!

I pointed out a garden beetle strolling by, using the flowers to stay cool in the shade the way we play under the maple tree to keep out of the sun.

I wondered what the flowers look like to the beetle. We laid down and peeked up at the flowers from our beetle’s eye view. Have you ever seen a bed of flowers from the bottom up? The petals are perfectly gathered into the cap of the stem, then splaying up and out towards the sun. The delicate petals let the sun shine through, creating rich and vibrant patterns of color pitched against the bright blue sky. 

It turns out, beetles are very lucky to live in the colorful shade of the flower bed.

Just then, a caterpillar started inching his way down the flower stem right towards us. We laid very still, and as he drew closer, I reached up and put out my finger to him. He graciously accepted my invitation.

Caitlin petted the caterpillar, studying his boneless, little body. He was bright green and furry all over. In time, he inched his way right into Caitlin’s hand and paid a gentle visit.

It turns out caterpillars tickle!

Then I wondered what it would be like to move like a caterpillar. Caitlin wanted to show me how, so we carefully returned our little green friend to his flower bed, and the two of us created great grass stains playing Caterpillar Crawls on the cool grass.

And like an old friend, it turns out, nature never disappoints.

MAKING INTRODUCTIONS
Wherever they go, young children encounter things they’ve never seen before, and as we know, first impressions are lasting impressions. So, here are a few concepts I use when introducing children to new things…

Follow, don’t lead. Whatever interests them is what you should spend time exploring. (Caitlin chose the flowers to explore, not me.)

Wonder aloud… When you wonder aloud, kids take up the idea and run with it.  This is a great way to draw them in AND draw their own conclusions about things. (I wanted Caitlin to explore all the flowers so said, “I wonder what colors they are?” “I wonder what they smell like?”)

Recognize the positive behavior you want, not the negative you don’t want. With new things, children won’t necessarily know how to behave. Focusing on positive behavior is a great way to give them the guidance they need.  (I didn’t want Caitlin to pick the flowers so I told her how much I liked how gentle she was being with them.)

Use YOUR Imagination. Try to imagine what it’s like to have never seen this before, and try to find new ways to explore it so that you’re seeing things for the first time too! (I had never seen flowers from the bottom up before.)

Physicalize New Ideas. If you have the opportunity, help children grasp new ideas by getting them to put their whole body into it. (I asked Caitlin, “I wonder what it feels like to move like a caterpillar?”)






CATERPILLAR CRAWLING
To start, have her lie on her tummy and raise her seat up and down. Once she’s got the hang of it, show her how to raise her seat up, then inch forward as she brings it back down to the ground to create an “inchworm” forward crawl.

CATERPILLAR WALKING
For an older child, have her stand and reach down, walking her hands out in front of her. Then walk her feet up to meet her hands.

Enjoy!